Sacred Hymns

The quatrain “Age” is derived from a sacred hymn which has appeared in various forms over the years.

In 1818 it appeared in “A Selection of Hymns adapted for Divine Worship” by Christopher Anderson for performance ‘Before the Worship of Lord’s Day Evening’:

And as yon sun descending rolls away,
To rise in glory at return of day;
So may we set, our transient being o’er,
So rise in glory on th’eternal shore!

The Sabbath Harp

In the ninth edition of “The Sabbath Harp, a selection of sacred poetry” in 1829 by the Revd. I. East MA it is the fourth verse of a hymn described as a ‘Sabbath Evening Hymn’ and has virtually the same wording:

And as yon sun descending rolls away,
To rise in glory at return of day,
So may we set, our transient being o’er,
So rise in glory on the eternal shore!

In  the next edition of the Sabbath Harp in 1830 the last line is changed slightly .

And as yon sun descending rolls away,
To rise in glory at return of day,
So may we set, our transient being o’er,
To rise in glory on the eternal shore.

The version on the Donkey Seat sundial has as its last line:

So may we rise upon the eternal shore

It’s not clear whether this is quoted from a different hymnal or whether it is simply a misquotation.

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