Isaac Gompertz

Devon A Poem

Devon A Poem

In the review of the poem/book Devon it is stated:

“No modern poets have composed volumes of odes like Pindar and Horace, but many of them have occasionally attempted this species of composition; the chief of these in English are Dryden, Pope, Addison, Gray, and Gompertz. (Dr Jamieson’s Grammar of Rhetoric, p 357.)”

Isaac Gompertz (1774-1856) was among the earliest Anglo-Jewish poets. He was one of the fifteen children of Barent and Miriam Gompertz all of whom either converted to Christianity or married out of the Jewish faith. Issac himself married Florence Wattier in Church in 1818.

Very little is now remembered of Isaac Gompertz, but his brother Lewis has left a name as, perhaps, the real originator of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

He published several works, including ‘Time ; or. Light and Shade,’ a poem in six cantos, 1815, and ‘The Modern Antique ; or, The Muse in the Costume of Queen Anne’ (1813). Both these works were well received by the press.

His poetical work on Devonshire, was written, as the author informs us:

“on a melancholy occasion, in one of the finest counties of England, so calculated to inspire poetical ardour”

What this ‘melancholy occasion ‘ was, he does not inform us, nor does a perusal of the work throw any light upon the subject. It was printed at Teignmouth in 1825 and in the notes appended to the volume are many references to the ‘Teignmouth Guide.’ An extract from the poem was carved on his tombstone; he is buried in the Jewish cemetery of Exeter.

2 thoughts on “Isaac Gompertz

  1. Pingback: Devon | Teignmouth in Verse

  2. Pingback: In Memoriam | Teignmouth in Verse

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